Jenny Brosinski

Berlin, Germany
JennyStudio
© Photo

"What I really love about painting are these unexpected twists and the inexplicable."

"What I really love about painting are these unexpected twists and the inexplicable."

Tell us about yourself. How would you introduce yourself to someone who has never seen your work?

I am a process-oriented abstract, rather minimalistic, painter, using oil colors on large raw canvas. Compositionally my work receives an openness in their reduction – I love to put the colors into the great emptiness of the canvas. Each trace I put on the canvas is a painterly assertion, developed from my experience as well as from speculation at the same time. – I also really like it when the canvas changes its materiality, e.g. by washing. The canvas changes its nature. A kind of recoding of its own materiality - like a metamorphosis - but in the end, it becomes a painting again.

Tell us about yourself. How would you introduce yourself to someone who has never seen your work?

I am a process-oriented abstract, rather minimalistic, painter, using oil colors on large raw canvas. Compositionally my work receives an openness in their reduction – I love to put the colors into the great emptiness of the canvas. Each trace I put on the canvas is a painterly assertion, developed from my experience as well as from speculation at the same time. – I also really like it when the canvas changes its materiality, e.g. by washing. The canvas changes its nature. A kind of recoding of its own materiality - like a metamorphosis - but in the end, it becomes a painting again.

How did your interest in art begin? Was it something that you were brought up surrounded by or did it come to you later on?

Even though I wasn't surrounded by art – I have had an early interest in drawing and creating using different materials since I could hold a pencil. 

How did your interest in art begin? Was it something that you were brought up surrounded by or did it come to you later on?

Even though I wasn't surrounded by art – I have had an early interest in drawing and creating using different materials since I could hold a pencil. 

"I love to put the colors into the great emptiness
of the canvas.
"

"I love to put the colors into the
great emptiness
of the canvas.
"

coolfoolpool

 

Untitled (cool, fool, pool), 2019, 230x190cm, oil, oil stick, spray paint, olive oil, fabric on canvas.
"Untitled (cool, fool, pool)", 2019, 230x190cm, oil, oil stick, spray paint, olive oil, fabric on canvas

What drives you and your work? What’s your main motivation to go to the studio every morning and paint?

What I really love about painting are these unexpected twists and the inexplicable – as well as this kind of periods of time of flurry activity – just to sit down afterwards and stare at things.

What drives you and your work? What’s your main motivation to go to the studio every morning and paint?

What I really love about painting are these unexpected twists and the inexplicable – as well as this kind of periods of time of flurry activity – just to sit down afterwards and stare at things.

Do you have any rituals to get in the right mood to paint?

Maybe trying to suppress my eagerness to really paint – whatever that means.

Do you have any rituals to get in the right mood to paint?

Maybe trying to suppress my eagerness to really paint – whatever that means.

studioj
JennyBrosinski-154_JJ reduced Kopie
© Photo by Joost Joossen 
© Photo by Joost Joossen 
Studio2
© Photo by Kerstin Müller
© Photo by Kerstin Müller

How do you cope with the alone time in your studio?

I really love to be alone.

How do you cope with the alone time in your studio?

I really love to be alone.

Is the environment in which you paint important to you, or are you thinking up projects no matter where you are?

I constantly think about projects or things, but I need my studio and a familiar environment to focus.

Is the environment in which you paint important to you, or are you thinking up projects no matter where you are?

I constantly think about projects or things, but I need my studio and a familiar environment to focus.

IMG_8730
IMG_5912
As Long As I‘m Here No One Can Hurt You, 2020, 200x180cm, oil, oil stick, charcoal on canvas.
"As Long As I‘m Here No One Can Hurt You", 2020, 200x180cm, oil, oil stick, charcoal on canvas
Untitled (and she likes everyone), 2019, 200x152cm, oil, oil stick, charcoal, olive oil, fabric, glue and dirt on canvas; It’s lonely out in space, 2019, 200x160cm, oil, oil stick, charcoal on canvas; I know you heard about me, 2019, 200x152cm, oil, oilstick, olive oil, spray paint, dirt on canvas.
"Untitled (and she likes everyone)", 2019, 200x152cm, oil, oil stick, charcoal, olive oil, fabric, glue and dirt on canvas; "It’s lonely out in space", 2019, 200x160cm, oil, oil stick, charcoal on canvas; "I know you heard about me", 2019, 200x152cm, oil, oilstick, olive oil, spray paint, dirt on canvas

Looking at the body of your work, what do you think are the touchstones that people associate it with? What do you hope they are?

As I am what I am – I can hardly say what my work triggers in others - I never intend to affect anything.

Looking at the body of your work, what do you think are the touchstones that people associate it with? What do you hope they are?

As I am what I am – I can hardly say what my work triggers in others - I never intend to affect anything.

What role does chance play in your work? Or do you know early on how you want the result to look like?

I see too much initial conceptual thinking as rather harmful. Yes, my eyes are trained to intuitively know what I could do, but I also like to be surprised by myself. I allow chance to intervene as I enjoy to trip myself up to consciously interfere in my work. This helps me to break out of my rhythm and to expand myself.

What role does chance play in your work? Or do you know early on how you want the result to look like?

I see too much initial conceptual thinking as rather harmful. Yes, my eyes are trained to intuitively know what I could do, but I also like to be surprised by myself. I allow chance to intervene as I enjoy to trip myself up to consciously interfere in my work. This helps me to break out of my rhythm and to expand myself.

"I really love to be
alone (in my studio)."

"I really love to be
alone (in my studio)."

59
I was looking at all the life, 2020, 84x60x100cm, Bronze, spray painted;
© Photo by Kerstin Müller.
"I was looking at all the life", 2020, 84x60x100cm, Bronze, spray painted

Musicians and theatre actors have direct feedback from the audience. How do you experience the effect of your art on people?

I need to be close to a painting and to let go of it at the same time –  if it comes to exhibitions it's a bit the same, if you know?

Musicians and theatre actors have direct feedback from the audience. How do you experience the effect of your art on people?

I need to be close to a painting and to let go of it at the same time –  if it comes to exhibitions it's a bit the same, if you know?

Thank you very much for your time, Jenny.

 

To see more of Jenny's work, visit her Instagram or her website.

 

Thank you very much for your time, Jenny.

 

To see more of Jenny's work, visit her Instagram or her website.

 

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