Stefano Casati

Stefano Casati

Bergamo, Italy
Bergamo, Italy
Schermata-2019-01-30-alle-14.42.47
© 

"I need to make abstract paintings to
express myself freely.
"

"I need to make abstract paintings to
express myself freely.
"

How did your interest in art begin? Was it something that you were brought up surrounded by or did it come to you later on?

I’ve always loved to draw since I was a child, I went to art school and after that I’ve started a career as a decorator and restorer, which is still my job today. I began doing abstract paintings around three years ago, so we can say I spend a lot of time around art.

How did your interest in art begin? Was it something that you were brought up surrounded by or did it come to you later on?

I’ve always loved to draw since I was a child, I went to art school and after that I’ve started a career as a decorator and restorer, which is still my job today. I began doing abstract paintings around three years ago, so we can say I spend a lot of time around art.

What drives you and your work? What’s your main motivation to go to the studio every morning and paint?

I think there are a lot of different motivations, the most important and basic one is that I enjoy it. I need to make abstract paintings to express myself freely, I think it’s a good way to heal from a life full of rules and duties. And another reason that motivates me to paint is that I want to experiment and try new techniques.

What drives you and your work? What’s your main motivation to go to the studio every morning and paint?

I think there are a lot of different motivations, the most important and basic one is that I enjoy it. I need to make abstract paintings to express myself freely, I think it’s a good way to heal from a life full of rules and duties. And another reason that motivates me to paint is that I want to experiment and try new techniques.

"Every brushstroke inspires the next."

"Every brushstroke
inspires the next.
"

"Every brushstroke inspires the next."

20200605_145828

 

 

Senza titolo, 2020, 80x100cm, Acrylic, enamel and oil pastels on canvas.
Senza titolo, 2020, 80x100cm, Acrylic, enamel and oil pastels on canvas. 

Do you have any rituals to get in the right mood to paint?

Not really, usually I just get in my studio and goof around with my phone, listen to some music, reorganize the mess from previous days, ready up the canvas and look up for the color that could be right for the image I have in mind at the time, all without pressure or any rush to get the right idea.

Do you have any rituals to get in the right mood to paint?

Not really, usually I just get in my studio and goof around with my phone, listen to some music, reorganize the mess from previous days, ready up the canvas and look up for the color that could be right for the image I have in mind at the time, all without pressure or any rush to get the right idea.

How do you cope with the alone time in your studio?

I just like to stay alone in my studio, it’s a precious personal time.

How do you cope with the alone time in your studio?

I just like to stay alone in my studio, it’s a precious personal time.

20200623_161139
20190511_110452
©
20190713_172745
.

Is the environment in which you paint important to you, or are you thinking up projects no matter where you are?

The environment is really important for me, I need all of my tools and my colors with me, the safety of a place I know very well helps me concentrate on my work a lot better.

Is the environment in which you paint important to you, or are you thinking up projects no matter where you are?

The environment is really important for me, I need all of my tools and my colors with me, the safety of a place I know very well helps me concentrate on my work a lot better.

Looking at the body of your work, what do you think are the touchstones that people associate it with? What do you hope they are?

It’s hard to say, for me, i think what gets to people the most are the colors and the balance of the shapes in that space, or at least, this is what I get from the comments I receive in general. I hope to offer a different range of emotions, all different from one another, since that is what I put into every piece, and would be a huge satisfaction to know the observer shares the same emotions I experienced while I made the piece, but I must admit, it’s truly pleasant when someone tells me something about my art that I didn’t realize before.

Looking at the body of your work, what do you think are the touchstones that people associate it with? What do you hope they are?

It’s hard to say, for me, i think what gets to people the most are the colors and the balance of the shapes in that space, or at least, this is what I get from the comments I receive in general. I hope to offer a different range of emotions, all different from one another, since that is what I put into every piece, and would be a huge satisfaction to know the observer shares the same emotions I experienced while I made the piece, but I must admit, it’s truly pleasant when someone tells me something about my art that I didn’t realize before.

IMG_20200616_170507_327
IMG_20200717_183235_419
Senza titolo, 2020, 86x109cm, Acrylic, enamel and oil pastels on canvas.
Senza titolo, 2020, 86x109cm, Acrylic, enamel and oil pastels on canvas.
Senza titolo, 2020, 86x109cm, Acrylic, enamel and oil pastels on canvas.
Senza titolo, 2020, 86x109cm, Acrylic, enamel and oil pastels on canvas.

What role does chance play in your work? Or do you know early on how you want the result to look like?

I never know how it is going to turn out, I know for certain it will be different from the idea I started out with. I get carried away from the process, every brushstroke inspires the next and every color gets me on a different road I didn’t think about earlier. I never do sketches, not even for the bigger pieces, I love to risk it all, the possibility that it just turns out like shit, because it’s amazing to work on something for 3 straight days thinking you will simply have to throw it away and then the right brushstroke in the right place makes it work out. I think I rely more on the intuition of that particular moment, than I do on chance and accidents.

What role does chance play in your work? Or do you know early on how you want the result to look like?

I never know how it is going to turn out, I know for certain it will be different from the idea I started out with. I get carried away from the process, every brushstroke inspires the next and every color gets me on a different road I didn’t think about earlier. I never do sketches, not even for the bigger pieces, I love to risk it all, the possibility that it just turns out like shit, because it’s amazing to work on something for 3 straight days thinking you will simply have to throw it away and then the right brushstroke in the right place makes it work out. I think I rely more on the intuition of that particular moment, than I do on chance and accidents.

"I never know how it is going to turn out."

"I never know how it is
going to turn out."

"I never know how it is going to turn out."

20191231_123318
ultimo lavoro del 2019, 2019, 80x120cm, Acrylic and oil pastels on canvas.
ultimo lavoro del 2019, 2019, 80x120cm, Acrylic and oil pastels on canvas.

Musicians and theatre actors have direct feedback from the audience. how do you experience the effect of your art on people?

I'm amazed when people appreciate my work. I paint for myself and finding out complete strangers get so emotionally involved with what I do it’s kinda staggering. Of course I’m happy about it, and I’m even happier if they eventually buy the art.

Musicians and theatre actors have direct feedback from the audience. how do you experience the effect of your art on people?

I'm amazed when people appreciate my work. I paint for myself and finding out complete strangers get so emotionally involved with what I do it’s kinda staggering. Of course I’m happy about it, and I’m even happier if they eventually buy the art.

Thank you very much for your time, Stefano.

 

To see more of Stefano's work, visit his Instagram or his website.

 

Thank you very much for your time, Stefano.

 

To see more of Stefano's work, visit his Instagram or his website.

 

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